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Wellness key to surviving stressful times: expert

Erin Moraghan describes herself as a born mover.

 

As the founder of Revkor Fitness + Lifestyle Training in Cambridge, she has made it her vocation to help others become ‘movers’ after leaving a healthcare philanthropy career in Toronto in 2013 to make this happen.

 

Her passion to assist others centres on promoting workplace wellness which came about after a decade of working in healthcare.

 

“We can’t get through stressful times without wellness at the forefront,” says the wellness expert.

 

The current COVID-19 crisis is clearly one of the most stressful situations facing all us, not just economically but emotionally and physically. In fact, experts are predicting a ‘tsunami’ of mental-health issues to develop in wake of this pandemic.

 

At our next YIP virtual workshop ‘Better Work Life Balance for Young Professionals’ on May 21, Erin will offer advice and tips aimed at empowering participants with the tools they need to reduce stress and improve productivity.

 

But more importantly, she hopes to inspire them in work and life.

 

“The entrepreneur culture often celebrates the non-stop grind,” says Erin. “But the reality is, rest and a calm, controlled mind are in the key to managing challenges and staying on course.”

 

She has already helped thousands across Canada by initiating programming focused on preventing and minimizing chronic pain and depression by embracing the power of mindful movement.

Erin can highlight some simple habits that can help accomplish amazing results, such as nutrition shifts to alter productivity, an eight-minute morning mindset practice that can ‘train’ your brain to be goal-centred, and a few suggestions for more quality sleep.

 

“This is the information you need to get and stay on track, striving strong during this unforgettable time in history,” she says.

 

Our virtual YIP (Young Innovative Professionals) session ‘Better Work Life Balance for Young Professionals’ takes place Thursday, May 21, from 9 a.m. to 10 a.m.

 

For information, please visit:  https://bit.ly/2WCBOXU

 

The Canadian Mental Health Association offers these tips to creating better work-life balance:

 

At Work

  • Schedule brief breaks for yourself throughout the day. Your productivity and effectiveness will increase if you take even a ten-minute break every two hours and overall, you will get more accomplished.
  • At the end of each day, set your priorities for the following day. Be realistic about what you can achieve in the time you have available.
  • Only respond to email once or twice a day. Then, shut off your email program to avoid being distracted as messages come in.
  •  Make a distinction between work and the rest of your life. Protect your private time by turning off electronic communications. Don’t be available 24/7.

 

At Home

  • Create a buffer between work and home. After work, take a brief walk, do a crossword puzzle, or listen to some music before beginning the evening’s routine.
  • Decide what chores can be shared or let go. Determine which household chores are critical and which can be done by someone else. Let the rest go.
  • Exercise. Even if it’s only for 15 minutes at a time, you’ll feel more energized and refreshed.
  • Create and implement a household budget. Start by setting aside some money from each pay cheque for the future.
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Deliberate communication a lost art

Does making a presentation in front of people send chills down your spine?

 

You’re not alone. Research shows that at least 75% of people struggle with some degree of anxiety or nervousness when it comes to talking in front of people.

 

Kevin Swayze, former journalist and communications consultant, hopes to help quash these fears by providing tips about good communication at our virtual YIP Growth Learning Series on April 28 entitled ‘Public Speaking 911’.

 

“I think that most people stand up in front of a crowd and think everybody there is against them, when in most circumstances they’re there with you and want you to succeed,” says Kevin.

 

He says the key to good communication centres on connecting with people, whether it’s one-on-one or in a large group, which is something he will stress during his learning session.

 

“I’m going to show how to polish your elevator pitch when you’ve got only a minute to talk to somebody; to connect with somebody and make yourself memorable.”

 

Kevin says stories are the best way to accomplish this and during his 30-year newspaper career tried to do just that.

 

“The best stories are always told through a person. I’ve always tried to do that with my writing,” he says. “People don’t want to be lectured at, they want to connect, and the best stories connect with people. The best communication is conversation.”

 

Kevin, a client communications teacher at Conestoga College, says he finds inspiration from the international students he instructs. Not only does he admire their bravery for travelling to another country to study, but the fact they will question his use of any corporate jargon or slang.

 

“I get the look from them,” he jokes, adding good communication doesn’t involve slang or jargon. “It’s pervasive everywhere and it kills communication because you’re either in or you’re out; jargon is exclusive, and it pushes people away.”

 

Kevin says the use of ‘buzz’ words doesn’t further proper communication and hopes to convey that to participants.

 

As well, he will also touch on some basic tips surrounding presentation, such as holding on to a piece of paper while standing up to speak.

 

“I like to give them something to hold in their hands so they’re comfortable,” says Kevin, who has been involved with Cambridge Toastmasters for the past four years.

 

He says the club, which consists of several groups under the Toastmasters banner, has helped him considerably.

 

“I’ve seen the change myself. I would not be able to teach as effectively,” says Kevin, explaining club members evaluate every aspect of any presentation by their fellow members. “It’s hard to find anyone who will give an honest and reasonable evaluation of something.”

 

He hopes YIP participants will leave the session understanding the importance of being an active listener when it comes good communication, noting the temptation of cellphones is difficult to ignore.

“Even if you leave your phone upside down on the desk it still draws your attention,” says Kevin.

He expects participants will already arrive with a set of their own communication tools.

 

“They will know how to communicate in bits and pieces. My goal is to reflect on what they do and think about what’s working well and where they can build,” says Kevin. “And encourage them to practice what really works well.”

 

He says most people don’t think about communication deliberately anymore.

 

“There’s no app that replaces face-to-face communication,” says Kevin.

 

The YIP (Young Innovative Professionals) Public Speaking 911 session, sponsored by Deluxe Payroll, will take place virtually Tuesday, April 28 from 9 a.m. to 10 a.m.

For information, visit: https://bit.ly/3cF92MN

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Success Later In Life

Mark Zuckerberg launched Facebook when he was only 19-years-old and a student at Harvard. He is now estimated to be worth 61.7 billion USD. 

 

David Carp founded Tumblr when he was 21-years-old. He is now estimated to be worth $200 million. 

 

Cameron Johnson used his creative talent to create greeting cards, earning him thousands of dollars which leveraged him to start his own business, SurfingPrizes.com before reaching his 20s. He is now estimated to be worth $3.2 million. 

 

With examples such as these, it’s no wonder the bar to succeed young has been raised. When it comes to success, most people believe that the sooner it happens, the better. This can lead to an enormous amount of stress. By the time most kids enter high school, the pressure to succeed has overtaken the fun of being young, and as the years pass, the idea that success might be farther than previously thought becomes kind of depressing. 

 

Although success at a young age is exciting, it’s not nearly as valuable as it is later in life. Imagine perfecting your craft and working year after year and finally, success comes. How amazing would that feel?

 

These five entrepreneurs are a great example of that. Take a look at these five entrepreneurs who succeeded later in life and are doing better than ever. 

 

1. Bryan Cranston

 

When hearing the name Bryan Cranston, Breaking Bad might be the next thing that follows. However, it wasn’t until Cranston was 44-years-old that he received his breakout role, starring in the comedy sitcom Malcolm in the Middle. Today, he is estimated to be worth $30 million.

 

2. J.K Rowling

 

One of the most infamous stories of later in life success comes from author J.K. Rowling. She was only in her mid to late thirties when she managed to sell the first book of the Harry Potter series. Today, she is estimated to be worth $1 billion. 

 

3. Vera Wang

 

Before becoming a world-renowned bridal gown designer, Wang was a competitive figure skater turned journalist. She spent many years as a senior fashion editor before deciding to design wedding gowns at the age of 40. Today, she is estimated to be worth $420 million. 

 

4. Ana Wintour

 

Ana Wintour, synonymous with the word Vogue, began her career in her late 20s after landing a senior fashion editor role at an erotic women’s magazine called Viva. After moving between a variety of magazines, Wintour finally landed her role at Vogue at the age of 39. Today, she is estimated to be worth $35 million. 

 

5. Alan Rickman

 

Rickman, most notably recognized for his role as Snape in the Harry Potter series, didn’t begin acting until the age of 42. His first role was Hans Gruber in the movie Die Hard, a role which propelled him into the world of acting. Before his death, Rickman’s estimated net worth was $16 million. 

 

Age is just a number. These entrepreneurs didn’t let age hold them back. Why should you?

 

 

 

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6 Things You Should Do In An Interview

You’ve graduated and now you want a job. It’s time to nail your interview. 

 

Interviews are one of the most important parts of any job you will get. In order for a company to get a feel of who you are as a professional, an interview lays the groundwork for who you are. This will be the standard you are held to throughout your job. No pressure, right?

 

If you want to start off on the right foot, take a look at these 6 tips on what you should do in an interview.  

 

1. Give a firm handshake and maintain eye contact

 

When you walk into your interview, you’re usually greeted with a handshake. Many employers use this to gauge your confidence levels. A handshake can say a lot. If a handshake is weak, employers might interpret it as a lack of confidence, the same goes for lack of eye contact. By failing to meet your interviewer's gaze, they will assume you have low confidence and that could potentially turn the interviewer off of hiring you. Always ensure you give a firm handshake while maintaining eye contact with the interviewer and remember to smile. Eye contact without smiling might give off a serial killer vibe and no one wants that. 

 

2. Do your research

 

It isn’t uncommon for a company to ask you what you know about them. In fact, it’s pretty standard. What isn’t standard is the deer caught in the headlights look. I doubt you want to be that deer. To avoid that, research all you can about the company. Most importantly, know what the company is and its function. Make sure to also research the interviewer. Bringing up an interviewer’s accomplishments will not only impress them, but show that you took the time to do the research. 

 

3. Dress professionally

 

This may seem like an obvious one but everyone’s definition of professional isn’t always the same. Black jeans might be professional to some people. Leggings might seem professional to someone else. It 's all a matter of opinion. To avoid accidentally showing up underdressed, show up overdressed. No one has ever lost a job because they dressed too well. If you even have to ask the question of whether you’re underdressed, you are. As a standard, dress pants and a blazer are always a good look, but the choice is yours. As long as it doesn’t have a drawstring of some kind, you should be fine. 

 

4. Show up early

 

Being late to an interview is a clear sign that you are scattered. If you can’t make it to the interview on time, how can you make it to work on time every day? To avoid looking sloppy, simply show up early. Now, here’s where it gets tricky. Showing up too early could actually be bad for you too. Surprising an interviewer by showing up half an hour early might agitate them more than impress them. A good rule of thumb is to show up usually around ten minutes early. That way you have time to collect your thoughts and the interviewer won’t feel rushed. 

 

5. Ask questions

 

If you’re interested in the job, show you are interested in the job. Most likely, there are a lot of things you won’t know about the job or the company. It’s important to ask questions so you not only get a solid idea of what will be expected of you but to show your enthusiasm about the job. An employer doesn’t want an apathetic employee who doesn’t care where they are or what they are doing. They want an employee who cares. Asking questions shows you care about the job and that you want to thoroughly understand the company itself.  

 

6. Follow up

 

The interview is over which means the pressure is off, right? Wrong. The pressure is still on. A mistake a lot of candidates make is to not follow up after an interview. By sending a quick email thanking them for the interview, you accumulate a lot of bonus points. Not only is it professional, it will make you stand out. Make sure not to wait too long after the interview either. The next day is usually a good time to send a quick email and will show that you are still thinking about the position. 

 

Good luck!

 

 

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Why Resolutions Are Still Relevant

The tradition of New Year's resolutions began with the Babylonians. At the beginning of each year, which began in mid-March, Babylonians would make promises to their gods that they would return borrowed objects and pay their debts. 

 

In a similar fashion, the Romans also made promises at the beginning of each year, but to one god - Janus. In 46 B.C. Julius Cesar decided to make January 1 the beginning of the year, naming the month after Janus for his ability to look to the future and the past. In turn, Romans would offer sacrifices to him and make promises of good conduct for the new year. 

 

Over the years, variations of this practice have trickled its way down into all parts of the world and molded itself into what we call New Year’s Day. So how is it, after all this time, we’ve managed to keep the tradition alive? 

 

It’s because as we enter the new year, it feels right to start it on the right foot. Sure, resolutions don’t always work out, but does that mean we should stop trying? 

 

In recent years, resolutions have gotten a bad rap. As the new year approaches, people feverishly write down all of their goals and dreams they have for the upcoming months and put their resolutions up where they can see it every day.

 

Come January, as if suddenly struck with amnesia, most of those carefully written resolutions are forgotten or thrown out and everyone is back at square one. By the time next year rolls around, no one wants to make resolutions because they never achieve any of them. 

 

Although the cycle might seem endless, it’s still important to make New Year’s resolutions. Even if the list gets lost in the pile, it’s still worth putting it out there. It’s still worth remembering all the things you want to accomplish. 

 

So, this year, write down your resolutions. Who cares what happens? Worst case scenario, you do it all over again next year. 

 

 

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Imposter Syndrome

Imposter Syndrome can be defined as an individual possessing feelings of inadequacy despite persistent evidence of success. According to a 2011 study, 70 per cent of people will experience at least one episode of imposter syndrome at one point or another. 

 

This issue has become particularly large in the tech industry with 58 per cent of those with tech-focused careers falling victim to the Imposter Syndrome, according to an informal study by social media site Blind. That doesn’t necessarily mean it only effects those in the tech industry. Anyone from any type of career can suffer.

 

Many people feel the effects of Imposter Sydrome due to the self-narrative that they are not good enough. Everything about this syndrome is based around professionals not believing in themselves. They often feel that although they have been hired and may already be succeeding in their job, they are not capable. It becomes the constant feeling that they are an imposter, pretending to know what they are doing when they feel the opposite. 

 

Over time this can have a significantly negative impact on the person, not only professionally but mentally. In order to make up for their feelings of inadequacy, the person will often give themselves extremely challenging goals that cause them even more stress. 

 

The constant negative self-talk can lead to more serious consequences such as self-loathing, self-sabotage, avoidance and job dissatisfaction. Everything may be going fine on the surface, but deep down they feel they are failing. 

 

As a young professional, it’s easy to suffer from Imposter Syndrome as everything is fairly new. Confidence often comes from the assurance of knowing what you're doing. However, when something new begins, doubt can surface as tasks become more challenging. 

 

To avoid these feelings, it’s important to be conscious of patterns. Celebrating success is not a crime. In fact, praise is often the fuel that pushes people along, assuring them that they are on the right track. 

 

Sharing success is also an undervalued practice. In an attempt to stay humble, most people keep their successes to themselves which in time, diminishes them. 

 

As a young professional, ensure you watch your thoughts and accept your successes. Doing these two simple things will allow you to flourish and avoid the negative impacts of the Imposter Syndrome. 

 

 

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Life Tips For New Grads

 

After graduation, it’s often difficult to gauge what your next steps are and how to make them. Like most new grads, you’re eager to impress and succeed in your field of work. That's why it's important to strengthen your professional and personal skills. Don’t forget that most of your work life is going to rely on your ability to work and get along with others.

 

With that said, here are five tips you can use as you enter the workforce. 

 

1. Strengthen Your Social Skills

 

Strengthening your social skills will not only help you in your personal life, but will make a great deal of difference in your professional one. Being able to communicate effectively with your employer and your co-workers is extremely important. There are many ways to strengthen these skills, all it takes is practice. Introduce yourself to someone new, take an interest in what they’re saying and use that as a reference to build your questions off of. The more you socialize, the easier it will become, and trust me, you will thank yourself come promotion time. 

 

2. Lower Your Standard

 

At first, the idea of lowering your standard might sound crazy, but I promise you that it’s not. After graduation, almost all new grads are hungry for success. For the first time, you actually feel prepared to work in the field your passionate about. Your hopes are set on landing the ideal job - a job that pays well and offers advancement opportunities. Truth is, things don’t always pan out that way. Thanks to a fluctuating job market, getting that dream job doesn’t always happen overnight, even if you do have the education to back it. Instead of beating yourself up for not reaching your goals right away, be patient and give yourself time. Be realistic and understand that life is full of ups and downs and just because you haven’t succeeded right out of the gate, doesn’t mean you never will. 

 

3. Narrow Your Focus

 

The world is full of potential. No matter where you look, there is always another door just waiting for you to walk through. This can often be overwhelming when entering the workforce. With so many opportunities at your fingertips, it may be hard to choose exactly what direction you want to go in. However, in order to achieve your dreams, it’s important to narrow your focus. Once you do that, you can create specific and achievable steps that you can take that will get you closer to your goal. Looking at the big picture has the potential to swallow you up in it. Writing your ideas down is a good way to purge all of those ideas you have. Once you get those out, it will be easier to focus on what you need to do in order to get what you want. 

 

4. Allow Room For Mistakes

 

It never feels good to make a mistake. Most of that is due to the feeling it gives us after we’ve made it. We feel like we’ve failed which can lead to the feeling of fear. 

 

Am I going to get fired? Am I really that bad at my job? 

 

The answer is no. If we didn’t make mistakes, we’d be robots. One mistake doesn’t mean game over. It means you have to get up and try again. Now that you’ve learned, your chance of making another mistake is low and even if you do, it’s not the end of the world. Remember, you’re still learning. Learning doesn’t stop in college, it continues throughout our daily lives. Mistakes are important, and in most cases, necessary. 

 

5. Develop Healthy Habits Early

 

A lot of people believe that it’s hard to teach an old dog new tricks. 

 

That’s because it is. 

 

The habits you make now will follow throughout your entire adult life. Those bad habits you picked up in college will follow you into your professional life. If you’re used to procrastinating or sleeping in, it’s time to change that. Before you land a job, gradually start waking up earlier in order to get your body used to it. That goes for any other bad habits you have. Slowly integrate healthier lifestyle choices into your daily routine and stick to them. It will be an adjustment, but it’s more than worth it. 

 

 

 

 

 

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Office Phrases Everyone Hates

Have you ever heard a phrase that just makes you cringe because you’ve heard it one too many times? According to a survey jointly conducted by two American companies, OnePoll and Jive Communications, you are not alone. 

 

Thanks to the habits of 2,000 American workers, a list of 40 cringe-worthy office phrases were collected. From that list, we’ve compiled the top 10 most hated office phrases for you to enjoy.

 

1. Give 110 per cent
2. Think Outside the Box
3. Hammer it Out
4. Heavy Lifting
5. Throw Them Under the Bus
6. Don’t Count Your Chickens Before They’ve Hatched 
7. Pushing the Envelope
8. Let the Cat Out Of The Bag
9. Let’s Circle Back 
10. Win-Win Situation

 

Tweet us @yipcambridge and share some of your most hated office phrases.  

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3 New Books to Help You Lead This Fall

Fall often feels like more of a fresh start than the New Year. For those working in academia or attending graduate programs, whose fiscal calendars begin again in October, or folks with kids that recently started their school year, the fall is a time of new beginnings. In many places, the weather shifts and there’s a certain crispness to the air that puts a pep in the step and increases focus and motivation.

 

Now is a great time to refresh your leadership as well. To add to the excitement of fall, here are three new book releases that will help you rejuvenate your leadership.

 

1. Reinforcements: How to Get People to Help You by Heidi Grant

Somehow, asking for help is the hardest thing in the world, especially for Type-A leaders. In her new book, author Heidi Grant, Ph.D., explores that while we hate to ask for help, most people would like to be helpers. She uses storytelling to deliver an extremely practical take on how to manage your team so they are contributing in the most helpful ways that feel meaningful to them, and effective for you.

 

2. Farsighted: How We Make the Decisions That Matter the Most by Steven Johnson

Oh, decision-making. This can be either a natural skill for one leader, or a fear-inspiring one for another. In his latest work, Steven Johnson dives into what tools are needed to conquer the complexities of decision-making, particularly for creatives. The key piece that Johnson explains and explores is that impactful decision-makers don’t just go with their gut all the time—they have a future-focused mindset that informs their decision-making process that will transform their organization.

 

3. Why The Best Are The Best: 25 Powerful Words That Impact, Inspire, And Define Champions by Kevin Eastman

After nearly 40 years in basketball, 13 of which in the NBA, Kevin Eastman has seen teams and leaders rise and fall. In his newest book, he details what has made these champions and championship teams effective, and translates that to everyday leaders. Through up-close-and-personal stories and practical strategies, Kevin will inspire you to give your team and personal leadership a jumpstart.

 

Recommendations received from Leadercast

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Strong Mentorships

If you were to ask yourself who were your best mentors in your life, I’m sure several people would come to mind from your childhood to even a person you currently see on a daily basis. Perhaps they were a great school teacher, a coach, an academic program advisor, or a supervisor from your first summer job. When you think about those mentors, can you truly remember what exactly they said to you that made you feel ...Supported? Inspired? Captivated? Chances are you don’t remember what they said, or what their hairstyle was, what they were wearing or their overall mannerisms. Often what shines though and has us thinking and reflecting about our time with them is how they made us FEEL. They encouraged, inspired, motivated, and enabled us to see a part of the world that we had not yet been exposed.


Now I’m going to ask you to reflect on another mentoring note – who were your WORST mentors in your life? Who were the tedious teachers, the exhausting coaches, the leaders with lack of patience or who showed favoritism to team members and did not foster teamwork? Those are unfortunately the people who had a large effect on your life in terms of your goals and your career choices. They may be a current co-worker or employer who doesn’t like to your ideas, micro manages you, and frustrates you to the point that you can’t focus on your actual work tasks. Fortunately, there is a silver lining to these negative individuals whom you have crossed paths in your life. It is the negative influence leaders who you should remember, and strongly take note of the choices they make since their role in your life demonstrates an exact OPPOSITE model of who you want to be when you are a leader, a mentor and a role model. Harness the energy, emotions and time you have had for these individuals and in turn, know that you will make choices as a leader to promote the passion of life-long learning, engage in new ideas and be patient as everyone cultivates into professionals and agents of change at a different rate.


I share these thoughts on positive and negative influence leaders in our lives because it is a great responsibility to be a mentor to others. It’s also a privilege. I have had the opportunity to not only mentor fellow colleagues but also be linked with a post-graduate school to be a preceptor to a specific student for 4, 6, and 8 week placements at a time. These weeks can feel more exhausting than a normal work week because all of your moves are being watched by a young professional starving to grow and make a contribution to the real world. Being a professional leader is often focused on the student in training yet what happens in a positive mentor/protégé relationship is that the mentor is the one who learns just as much as the student. I love when students/young colleagues ask me questions such as “Can you tell me why you decided to complete that task first?” or “How did you come to make that decision?” because these are the questions that we often forget to ask ourselves on a daily basis in the midst of our busy lifestyles and careers.


So the next time you are asked to take on a student or a new colleague in training, please don’t hesitate to help as you will benefit in your career as well. Mentorship is a beautiful experience full of reflection and engagement of both parties, bringing everyone to a level of asking more questions and deeper understanding of their careers – and quite possible themselves.  Remember, you could be that positive, influential role model that this young professional needs.
 

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Brian Rodnick
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May 11, 2020
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April
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January
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2019

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Yes, You Really Do Bel ...
May
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February
Email Etiquette
January
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Why Resolutions Are St ...
Imposter Syndrome
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