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Imposter Syndrome

Imposter Syndrome can be defined as an individual possessing feelings of inadequacy despite persistent evidence of success. According to a 2011 study, 70 per cent of people will experience at least one episode of imposter syndrome at one point or another. 

 

This issue has become particularly large in the tech industry with 58 per cent of those with tech-focused careers falling victim to the Imposter Syndrome, according to an informal study by social media site Blind. That doesn’t necessarily mean it only effects those in the tech industry. Anyone from any type of career can suffer.

 

Many people feel the effects of Imposter Sydrome due to the self-narrative that they are not good enough. Everything about this syndrome is based around professionals not believing in themselves. They often feel that although they have been hired and may already be succeeding in their job, they are not capable. It becomes the constant feeling that they are an imposter, pretending to know what they are doing when they feel the opposite. 

 

Over time this can have a significantly negative impact on the person, not only professionally but mentally. In order to make up for their feelings of inadequacy, the person will often give themselves extremely challenging goals that cause them even more stress. 

 

The constant negative self-talk can lead to more serious consequences such as self-loathing, self-sabotage, avoidance and job dissatisfaction. Everything may be going fine on the surface, but deep down they feel they are failing. 

 

As a young professional, it’s easy to suffer from Imposter Syndrome as everything is fairly new. Confidence often comes from the assurance of knowing what you're doing. However, when something new begins, doubt can surface as tasks become more challenging. 

 

To avoid these feelings, it’s important to be conscious of patterns. Celebrating success is not a crime. In fact, praise is often the fuel that pushes people along, assuring them that they are on the right track. 

 

Sharing success is also an undervalued practice. In an attempt to stay humble, most people keep their successes to themselves which in time, diminishes them. 

 

As a young professional, ensure you watch your thoughts and accept your successes. Doing these two simple things will allow you to flourish and avoid the negative impacts of the Imposter Syndrome. 

 

 

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Brian Rodnick
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November 1, 2019
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